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by on outgoing president 52 years ago this woke was the role in government in solving america's problems. we'll share with you some of the comments of dwight eisenhower in his farewell address. what is the role in government in solving america's problems. you can join the conversation by giving us a call. you can send us an e-mail at journal at cspan.org. let's begin with the act two second terms for u.s. presidents have been problematic but not cursed. what history will says about how president obama will do. will obama blow another mandate. meanwhile from the hill newspaper there is this words from senator mitch mcconnell after four years of frosty relations senator mcconnell is reaching out to the president. senator mcconnell called on the president to use his inauguration speech to focus on the massive federal debt happeninging over the heads of our children and grandchildren. it is an offer senator mcconnell made four years ago but was soon forgotten. in his editorial he said given the serious nature of the challenge, i hope the president uses his address to acknowledge the seriousness
. it'll continue for about 90 minutes. there'll be a panel on improving government performance. we'll have it live for you here on c-span2. yesterday and today johns hopkins university in baltimore has been hosting a summit on reducing gun violence. speakers have included new york city mayor michael bloomberg and maryland governor martin o'malley. this afternoon at 4 eastern they will hold a news conference to release their recommendations for stemming gun violence. we'll have live coverage here on c-span2. again, that will be at 4 p.m. eastern. >>> and right around this time to have year every year governors address their state legislatures on the state of their states. laying out the priorities for the new year. tonight at 7:30 we'll take you live to the kansas statehouse for an address by the state's governor, sam brownback. that'll get underway at 7:30 eastern. >> he had been talking about this dream that he had had. he had talked about it for years, you know? the american dream. and that had become his dream. and he had been in detroit just a few months before, and he had talk
minister tell the house what the government is doing to keep pensioners warm in this cold weather, and will he join me in congratulating the suffolk foundation for the success, for the great success of their surviving -- [inaudible] >> what this government has done is, first of all,tive the biggest -- give the biggest increase in the state pension of five pounds, 30 last year. we've kept the cold weather payments at the high level, and we're replacing the warm front scheme, and while that helps something like 80,000 houses a year, the eco could help up to 230,000 houses a year. that is what we're doing, and it's a record we should be proud of. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the prime minister should know that the ons have recently released figures that show there were 24,000 extra cold weather deaths over the winter of 2010-2012. the majority of those who perished were over the age of 75. so, mr. speaker, can i ask the prime minister if he thinks his government should do more to help the elderly and the vulnerable and less to help millionaires with tax cuts? >> as i just said, we are
sure the government does not shut down. he tried to take that specter off the table. but this is a very tough fight that's getting more and more problematic, larry, because the president said he's going to break the habit of crisis-driven fiscal negotiations. if he's going to succeed in that, somebody is going to have to break and it may have to be soon because treasury secretary geithner said this afternoon we could hit the debt ceiling and exhaust all the extraordinary measures he's been taking as soon as one month from now. >> you know, john, 2010, 2011, the 2012 he negotiated. he voted against the debt ceiling i believe in 2006. why all of a sudden does he not want have to have negotiations? >> i think will's happened, larry, is that the president spent 2011 and 2012 with republicans squeezing him on his priorities, having opposed him during the first two years of his presidency. then that really had the wind at their back. the tea party election of 2010 had given republicans very big numbers on the hill. and he's decided that he backed up, and he backed up and he backed up, and he'
under the flag today. so the question is whether the institutions in the way that the government has dominated and if you will corrupted the independence of the institutions will last even if we went to the election if they declare that he dies tomorrow which there is a rumor that they would do that actually going around now, that if he would be declared dead and they called an election within 30 days and the opposition won, meaning the sympathy vote for the candidate which is difficult after what we saw on december 16th and dhaka election we just talked about, chavez has 20 of 23 governors. 11 of the governors that were run by the chavez party are former military officials, including four ministers of defense, who are now governors of their respective states. several of them are all along the office of the control campaign list because of their work with the farc so we have a situation where people are in control of things, so that even if henry embrey de four e elected president in this election it's the opposite -- he's the head of the opposition who ran against chavez and got a 4
down the cost of health care, even in the private sector as well. >> when is the government -- when is the government ever done that? with george bush's plan, you were critical and had a right to be for prescription drug benefit. the argument ises that it would drive down the cost of those drugs. if anything they have soared since that benefit came in because the government cannot act as a source of even buying in bulk for cutting prices. >> that's exactly right. and in fact i'm also supportive of legislation that would allow medicare, just leak the veterans administration to negotiate with the manufacturers, the drug companies, for lower drug prices. and i guess the point is that there are -- >> it doesn't work. didn't work in the case of drug prescriptions. if you were to expand this to care, what -- >> no, no. >> what is the chance you would get more bang for the buck? >> here's the difference. if medicare were allowed to negotiate with the pharmaceutical companies it would work, and again, that estimate is about over ten years, about $200 billion in lower prices that the federal
obligations. you can't do that. and that's not a credible way to run this government. we've got to stop lurching from crisis to crisis to crisis, when there's this clear path ahead of us that simply requires some discipline, some responsibility and some compromise. that's where we need to go. that's how this needs to work. major garrett. >> thank you, mr. president. as you well know, sir, finding votes for the debt ceiling can sometimes be complicated. you, yourself, as a member of the senate, voted against a debt ceiling increase. and in previous aspects of american history -- president reagan in 1985, president george herbert walker bush in 1990, president clinton in 1997 -- all signed deficit reduction deals that were contingent upon or in the context of raising the debt ceiling. you, yourself, four times have done that. three times, those were related to deficit reduction or budget maneuvers. what chuck and i and i think many people are curious about is this new, adamant desire on your part not to negotiate, when that seems to conflict with the entire history in the modern era of am
've got the funding of the government, the so-called sequestered, which is a set of automatic spending cuts that were delayed by two months as part of the fiscal cliff arrangement, and we have the infamous debt ceiling, which will come into play. so we will be seeing a lot of activity in the next few months, debates about people criticize the government, about the size of the deficit, and it a lot of back and forth over these three issues. without going into all the different ramifications, i want to say one word about the debt ceiling, which is not everybody understands what the debt ceiling is about. the debt ceiling -- raising the debt ceiling, which congress has to do periodically, gives the government the ability to pay its existing bills. it does not create new deficits. it does not create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family which is trying to improve its credit ratings and i know how we can save money, we will not pay our credit card bills. not the most effective way to improve your credit rating. it was a very slow solution to the debt ceiling
and government reform committee. host: good morning. house members have returned to washington with votes slated later today for emergency aid for victims of superstorm sandy. new york is poised to become the first state to act in response to the mass shooting in newtown, connecticut, keeping guns out of the hands of the mentally ill and banning assault weapons. president obama has in hand to the recommendations from joe biden on gun-control and will push for action. the front page of the washington journal says president obama escalates the fight on the w economy. is the debt ceiling negotiable? your thoughts? send us a tweet or post your comment on facebook. you can also send us an e-mail. president obama held his last official news conference of the first term yesterday in the east room of the white house. here's what he had to say on the debt ceiling debate. [video clip] >> republicans and congress have two choices. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect ransomed in exchange for
of government. a set of principles emerged that there is not universal agreement on, but overwhelming consensus and they were the foundation of the recommendations. if you'll permit and another 10 to 12 minutes, i want to lay out what they are from the perspective of the president. the first foundational principle is there is a second amendment. the president and i support the second amendment that comes with the right of law-abiding responsible citizen to own guns, gives a further protection as well as recreation. the second foundational principle, certain people in society should not and legally can be disqualified from being able to own a gun because they are unstable or they are dangerous. they are not the citizens that in fact the vast majority of gun owners comprise. three, we should make common sense judgment about keeping dangerous weapons off our streets. clearly within the purview of the government at the same time recognizing, honoring them being compliant with the second amendment. and for, this isn't just about guns. it is about the coursing of our culture. the coursing of our cult
get government to work and get good things to happen. you can overpower the extremists with intelligence and with reason and with common sense. and you can make this state a safer state. >> the national rifle association responded late today to new york's actions. they put out a statement saying naturally that they are outraged by what new york has done. it should also be noted that the nra is frequently outraged. but other states are looking to join new york. maryland governor martin o'malley, colorado governor john hickenlooper, connecticut governor dan malloy, illinois governor jack markell have all announced in the past few days announced ambitious legislative proposals on gun reform in their own states. and of course federally, tomorrow ahead of schedule, president obama is set to unveil his own set of proposals in response to the newtown school shooting. the white house releasing this picture today of vice president biden, presenting his findings to the president and other cabinet members in a gun policy meeting. >> i can tell you that tomorrow the president and v
of resistance. but we deal with that through enlightened government policies, feedback, and changing them when we find they do not work. and encouraging the private sector where the ideas come up. i do not think -- steve jobs working in his career came up with stuff. i did not know that steve jobs was working in that group on the computer. we want to have space for that. we need space for innovation, it is a constant challenge. the power of the conventional is so overwhelming and the convergence is so powerful that to try to innovate is exhausting in government. let me tell you. in spite of that, i am ready for several more years of innovation. i hope you are. i hope california is. [laughter] [applause] >> for this next question, let's pretend that president obama is sitting in this chair. but pretend this is a private room -- let's pretend this is a private room. we need everyone out there to be quiet. if you were here along with the president, what are the two things you would tell him you need to make your state more competitive or all states more competitive? >> i think and i am an unabash
. tonko: people have said that there is a need for government, they want effective government, efficient government. well, i think when we look at some of the data that are collected, representative garamendi, it is important for us to acknowledge that as we rebuild in our areas that have been damaged by mother nature, you don't just replace, you need to improve upon the situation. for instance, if there are data that are telling us that more and more water volume is expected in certain watershed areas, as in my district, it would be foolish to spend tax dollars, the hard-earned taxpayer dollars, and simply replace an infrastructure, a bridge, at the same height, at the same span if in fact we know that the water and the force of that water is growing with time. and so these are the ways to, i think, incorporate the soundness of academics and analyses that go into how we respond to this. and if much of it is driven by climate change, global warming, some of the impacts of mother nature that are causing these disruptive scenarios, then ought we not look at sound policy that then stretches
in government today. marcia mcnutt has worked with me for many, many occasions, most notably during the oil spill. you're looking at one of the fine leaders that worked with the government to make decisions matter and make the difficult decisions. i'm proud to work with her during the oil spill and i'm proud to introduce her now. marcia? >> thank you. the gulf coast is under threats and in particular, i want to speak of those that impact life and property. it is a deadly combination of loss of natural protection, rising seas from global warming, increasing intensity and number of storms, and more people and critical infrastructure that lies in the coastal zone in the path of those storms. there's no doubt but the coastal zone is a desirable but it is a dangerous place to live and it is getting more dangerous all the time. so what is the solution? well, the good news is that research can help. let me provide you with an analogy. we know that fault zones are dangerous places to live but thanks to science we have increased more than two orders of nag any attitude the safety of living in earthq
from the devastation of hurricane sandy. in the wake of large storms like this, governments knee-jerk reaction is often to throw money at forecasting or storm modeling in order to prevent widespread damage in the future. unfortunately, even with the best imaginable system, forecasting systems, we would not have been able to prevent the structural damages which resulted from this particular storm. yet, here we are debating funding for projects due to go online years from now in an emergency supplemental bill, which is meant to provide aid to those who are still suffering in the wake of sandy. fiscal year 2013, the national weather service received a total of $991 million. that's $20 million over their initial request. noaa is expected to ask for additional funding for this particular project over the next two years, nearly $15 million in fiscal year 2014 and $18 million in fiscal year 2015, the year the first new satellite is due to launch. it is appears that the funding included in the frelinghuysen amendment is simply meant to get the grant portion of this project finished just
they are afraid they will spy on them and report information back to the federal government. host: let's go back to what you said at the beginning when you talk about the politics of this. this headline -- that was in reference to what harry reid had said. some democrats backing down from an assault weapons ban. dianne feinstein but to introduce her assault weapons ban in the 113th congress. chris in washington, independence. -- independent. caller: i'm against any more legislation on guns. it's nonsense. we are back to demonizing inanimate objects. if we want to get rid of things that are deadly, ban the automobile. this is nonsense. brady.ed this with a g it did not work. it did not lower crime. that's not the issue. host: what is the issue and where do you see compromise? caller: i don't see compromise. why should this even be an issue? it is a media-driven emergency. other than that, there is none. host: the new york times front page story -- we will go next to dennis in upper marlboro, maryland, democratic caller. caller: good morning. thank you for the opportunity, first of all. the gentle
to gather dust on the shelf, of some agency, in government, a set of principles emerged, that there was not universal agreement on, but overall whelming consensus on, and they were the foundation of the recommendations. if you'll permit me about another 10-12 minutes, i want to lay out to you what they are from the perspective of the president and me. the first foundational principle is, there is a second amendment. the president and i support the second amendment. and it comes with the right of law-abiding, responsible citizens to own guns. use it for their protection as well as for recreation. the second foundational principle, certain people in society should not, and legally can be disqualified from, being able to own a gun because they are unstable or they are dangerous. they are not the citizens that in fact the vast majority of gun owners x-ray. -- owners comprise. three, we should make commonsense judgments about keeping dangerous weapons off our streets. clearly within the purview of the government, at the same time recognizing, honoring, and being compliant wit
. >> aye. >> mr. become governing. >> aye. >> mr. hastings. >> aye. >> mr. poll. >> aye. >> mr. chairman? >> chairman no. for yea's, nine's. the amendment is not agreed to. the gentleman is wreck wreck d recognized. >> mr. chairman i make the move that -- number 73 would provide $125 million toward the emergency watershed protection program. >> is there further discussion? >> vote now be on the amendment say aye. >> aye. >> no. >> no. >> amendment is not agreed to. >> mr. chair, i question a -- >> we ask the clerk to ask for a roll call. >> miss fix. >> no. >> mr. bishop, no. >> mr. kole? >> mr. wood annual no. >> mr. knew gent. >> no. >> mr. webster? no. miss hoytman, no. >> mr. burgess. >> no. >> miss fodder, aye. >> mr. mcgovern. >> aye. >> mr. hays'ings. >> aye. >> mr. poleis. >> aye, mr. came? injury know. clerk will report, four yea's, nine nays. the amendment is not agreed to. we now move to the motions made be the advice chairman of the committee. toness favor say aye. >> aye. >> those opposed, no. the amendment passes, and we would go ahead and recognize mr. coll will be happeni
are emerging about the algerian government raid to rescue foreign nationals held captive at a bp-related gas plant. some americans escaped but others are still being held. duncan, what's the latest? >> reporter: good morning. the latest has come from the british prime minister who has been speaking to his algerian counter part and he said they are still pursuing terrorists and possibly some of the hostages in other areas of the site. what's unclear is how many hostages escaped yesterday during that raid by algerian security forces. it's thought at least four people were killed, two british, two filipinos. the numbers keep changing. one news agency is quoting the militants saying 35 of the hostages were killed. the fact that these numbers keep on varying show us just how hard it is to get information out of the saharan desert. a lot of uncertainty for families wait ago round the world. >> thank you. >>> for the first time in over two decades, the u.s. has recognized the government of somalia. secretary of state hillary clinton calls the official recognition a milestone in somalia's fight agai
additional tax incentives. finally, and most important, we should have the federal government lead by example. the department of energy's management of four large marketing agency should be the gold standard for integrating renewables into the grid, upgrading transmission capacity and leading on conservation. the g.s.a., with over 300 million square feet of federal office space, should demand that all our facilities, every one we at least buy or build, should be of the highest energy efficiency. the federal fleet should be on the cutting edge of fuel efficiency standards. and finally, the department of defense, the largest consumer of energy in the world, needs to redouble its efforts. the pentagon is already moving in the right direction, but it's not just about saving money in the long term. it's providing operational flexibility and reducing velarde nurblet from inefficient and dangerous fossil fuels. those fuel tanker trucks in afghanistan and iraq might as well have had great big bull's eyes on them for terrorists. the military knows this, and we should give maximum support even in a tim
, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immigration reform, bank regulations, and so on down the list. it was a progressive case, but it wasn't necessarily a big government case. saying there's a mix of -- >> let's talk about some examples. i think you know them. the right wing ideas of rights is leave me alone, i got enough guns here in this house to hold you off for a couple days anyway if the government comes in with helicopters. progressives' idea of rights is a couple young people would like to go to the university of mississippi. it took the federal troops to go in there to get them in the door. a governor named george wallace tried to stop people at the door at the university of alabama, they had to be pushed aside. that's an aggressive communitarian notio
like that. they keep it for one reason only -- so they can protect themselves against the government. that's what it's all about. host: "the new york times" editorial today weighing in saying the white house has a rare chance to propose and pushed through an agenda for public safety. the assault weapon ban should be renewed and tightened with a special emphasis on those that hold more than 10 rounds. offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. god of the universe, we give us thanks for giving us another day. the people's house gathers today and celebrates in its gathering the wonder of our constitutional form of government. our nation has once again achieved something so often lacking in our world history, the peaceful transition of democratic government. the major change of party in control did not take place, it is still the american experience that our streets are peaceful and winners and losers of elections move on with their lives of dignity. we thank you again for the inspiration of our nation's founders and the legacy they left us with. may the member
to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the power to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said, the reason why i want to get it passed by congress instead of issuing an executive order is because by attorney general tells me that is the only way they can subpoena anybody. given what the problems are, some people may not want to come to testify. so the commission most important power of subpoena. they went and looked all over the place to see what the problems or. they made recommendations that were controversial but seemed to make sense. so after they had been there for a while it was clear they need to be reauthorize to needed to be continued to work on these issues. then of course bell rock crisis and those civil-rights movement started to heat up. it was clear that there was a need. in the commission spent the next few years figuring out what to recommend to the gove
the way the two economies govern themselves? >> we have dealt with the issues with safeguarding other countries. we did that in the negotiations with colombia. we did that in negotiations with panama. if any two entities can resolve those issues, it is the eu and the united states. essentially, what the eu has been doing, in my judgment, to use regulatory provisions. i don't like the word protect exactly because it's overused, but to essentially safeguard the market from our competition. so we should be able to do that than to structure should be able to meet those tests. that i think is very doable. the french have to be willing to let us enter into their market. and we have had the same problem with russia, and i think that we have basically taken the step to resolve it. do it with russia, we can do it with the eu. >> you talk about the republican party changing. when the democrats were the majority, they had blue dog democrats from south carolina and mississippi and louisiana and north carolina and virginia. they are gone. the democrats have changed. the democrats are far more unif
raising the debt ceiling gives the government the ability to pay its existing bills. it doesn't create new deficit spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family that's trying to improve its credit rating. families that say, i know how we can save money, we won't pay her credit card bills. it was the sole solution to the debt ceiling in august of 2011 in the u.s. downgraded last time. so all these issues are important and it's very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where government doesn't pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much of the challenges actually were addressed in a deal, it certainly went part way, but leaves a number of issues still on the table. would you care to raise that as an additional fiscal cliff that is facing us? would you think that it's not as concerning as it was when you raise that term initially? >> as i said the fiscal cliff, if it is allowed to take place, it probably would have traded a recession this year. a good bit of that has been a
government structure. so as i said, -- and in the for the question of -- [inaudible] in trying to share the information we have, and the need to not create a panic. it was a very difficult situation. i think we need to -- [inaudible] the experience and try to come up proper lessons. and that certificate still continuing. as long as we're talking about preparedness perhaps you would like to talk about whether there's environmental preparedness. how does it work? >> exactly get ready for this. >> it's the best preparation for the kinds of environmental disasters. i want to touch upon the education issue and mention briefly that, you know, when the fukushima raid logical disaster hit us, there was a great lack of educate scientists in the community capable of tackling many of the aspect of the environmental impact. we have a shortage of radio geochemistry and geo-- stemming from the fact that we never thought such a thing could happen again. and so emphasis in the field dropped off. at the moment we really need to train a few more folks to handle these kinds of emergencies in the future. t
, in march, government spending does run out. they would focus on a longer-term debt ceiling increase sometime in april or may. that is the strategy from house republicans. president obama says he has not even entertained any type of negotiations. republicans should agree to raise the debt ceiling because having to raise it is the result of appropriations already passed and signed into law. back to you. melissa: thanks so much. ashley: here with reaction to the gop when it peter welch. thank you for joining us. you say, look, republicans are making it an "economic weapon of mass distraction." do they get is a continuation of that? >> it is actually progress for the republican confidence, but it is not progress for the country. that tack tick is not one that they can hold onto because they know it will plunge this country into a deeper recession. they have been -- it is a way to say they are avoiding. ashley: it really is not addressing the issue, though, what will it take to get that in place. i know that you, of course, have been leading the charge to have the president to prevent th
. these are composed of experts on terrorism across government agencies and make recommendations to the deputies who assist the president's cabinet in formulating a response to crises involving terrorism. there was an attempt from the outset it seems by officials at the state department and elsewhere to downplay this as a terrorist attack against americans and it's not clear why, because these teams, and the fast team of marines from rota, spain were not sent to benghazi. as a result the f.b.i. could not enter the benghazi consulate for 24 days. that prevented them from doing crucial work on the ground in benghazi that would have helped them get to the bottom of who was responsible for this attack. >> reporter: what remaining questions do you have about the conclusions of the accountability review board, that is a committee headed by admiral mike mullen and former ambassador thomas pickering about mistakes made in benghazi. >> reporter: wong of the recommendone of the questions we have is they say they interviewed 100 witnesses and officials who were involved that night in the benghazi response, but
are approaching a number of other fiscal critical watersheds coming up. we have the funding of the government, the so-called sequester, number of spending cuts that were laid as part of the fiscal cliff of arrangement. and we have the infamous debt ceiling that will come into play. we will see a lot of activity in the next few months, debates about the purpose of the government, about the size of the deficit, and a lot of back- and-forth over these three issues. i want to say one word about the debt ceiling. not many people understand what the debt ceiling is about. raising the debt ceiling, which congress has to do periodically, gives the government the ability to pay its existing bills. it doesn't create new deficits. it does not create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family, which is trying to improve its credit rating, shane, i know how we can improve our credit rating. we will pay your credit card bills. that is not the best way to improve your credit rating. all of these issues are important, but it is very important that congress take necessary action to
indoor and know the importance of making sure our government protect and serve those who protect and serve us. as an attorney and as the dean as one of the top public interest law schools, i run an institution that permits access to justice and seek to train the next generation of leaders and public servants. as a candidate for michigan secretary of state in 2010, early support from emily's list helped me to raise my voice and share my story. a stopper came to michigan, looked me in the eye and she said she knew i had it in me to win. thanks to her support, i was able to earn more votes than any other democratic candidate in the state and become the highest democratic votes debtor in michigan in 2010. -- vote getter in 2010. this means early support an early investment in young female candidates. it means nurturing us, our careers, and strengthening our ability to lead. it also means recognizing that our vote is our voice. we must work, each one of us must work come to make sure that women run and vote. women voters everywhere are informed and engaged, ready to participate. liste
of the government, about the size of the deficit, and a lot of back and forth over these three issues. i think i just want, without going into all the different ramifications, i want to say one word about the debt ceiling, which is that not everybody understand what the debt ceiling is about. the debt ceiling, raising the debt ceiling, which congress has to do periodically, gives the government the ability to pay existing bills. it doesn't create new deficits. it doesn't create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family, which is trying to improve its credit rating sank i know how we can save money, we won't pay off credit card bills. not the most effective way to improve your credit rating. it was the very slow solution to the debt ceiling in august 2011 i got the u.s. downgraded last time. so it's very, very important that all these issues are important but it's very, very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where our government doesn't pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much
to have a practice at the commission that the government witnesses would be on the first panel and they object to that inappropriate cases but the reason i'm pointing it out -- i will mention one other thing. the past few times we've invited someone from the department of justice the federal law mandates all federal agencies shall cooperate fully with the commission. they won't send to testify at any time in the past couple of years. so it kind of the allies at least one false myth and that is that the military doesn't take this issue very seriously. so after trying to compliment you, i did want to -- i think to the vice admiral to get up to speed on some of the issues some of the biggest improvements for the kind of career tracking that i think you'll have the lead on in the media and those of us that are -- i was a very brief litigator but prosecutors and other litigators you learn to be a great lawyer by watching the great council, criminal defense working side by side, then having them available to counsel you and for the c-span viewers who may not know why if you could ela
now have the nra arguing -- >> for larger government. >> for larger federal government, putting armed people like government troops into schools. as opposed to leaving them -- >> the nra came out with a proposal to put guards in schools, everybody from the president's party dumped on them. they went after them hammer and tongs. >> that specifically to the president is not about democrats. >> push back -- >> and the president did not sate. it's just a lie. >> let me just push back on that just to play devil's advocate here. if at elite schools they have private security and armed guards, what is wrong with at public schools having armed guards? >> and why not pay for it? >> right. so if you want -- if you're arguing for that massive expansion of government, what that would require, right, and we're in a budget -- >> it's not massive. >> it is massive. >> we're just hypothetically talking. >> they wouldn't even pay for the couple million that was in a safe school program. they cut that down to zero. and now they're basically saying we want to put armed guards in every school. and to ove
health care is, it's very government-controlled and it's becoming more government-controlled so it's the opposite of free enterprise capitalism. >> all that and more in just minutes away, first, manti mania. notre dame football star manti te'o in the center of a big hoax, at the the victim or in on the hoax. and a teammate calling him a liar. >> and joining us with the latest facts on this story and jack, before we get to your conversations with teammates of him, i'm curious, set the stage. what are the facts as we know it tonight? >> well, the facts are so convoluted. it's such a long, deep rabbit hole where the story comes from. the quick version is that here you have manti te'o, star linebacker, notre dame, goes on to come in second place in heisman trophy ballots. he had this girlfriend he allegedly met a few years ago, she allegedly was diagnosed with leukemia and he kind of rode this wave of this tragic love story that happened to coincide on the same day as his grandmother's died, this fictitious girlfriend passed away and he was crying on the side line of the michigan win m
and the kidnapping is in revenge for french intervention in the country of mali. overnight the algerian government has been in talks with both united states and france, and we understand that the algerian government is now talking to tribal leaders that apparently do have ties to the terrorists. here's how the thing went down. there was a bus carrying american, british, norwegian french and japanese workers. that bus was ambushed by two armed men and two people were killed. they took off to the gas field and the total number of hostages remains unclear but reports say it ranges from 15 to 40, including 7 americans. >> they are a threat. they are a threat to our country. they are a threat to the world. and wherever they locate and try to establish a base for operations, i think that constitutes a threat that all of us have to be concerned about. >> the u.s. government is also calling this a terror attack. and this is the guy believed to be behind it all. his name is moqtar, a one-eyed veteran jihaddist with ties to al qaeda. he was apparently kicked out of the network because they say he was more i
of questions already are coming from the united states about the algerian government's tactics in the operation that could have put the hostages in jeopardy. now, we also want to let you know that right now, there's a chartered flight en route of bp employees from algeria. it is headed towards london to gatwick airport. now, that could be landing at any moment. we don't yet know if the passengers are any of the freed hostages or if there are americans on board, but as we get that information, we're going to share that with you. the brother of an irish national who escaped from captivity had a harrowing story. he spoke to cnn today and described what happened to his brother. >> yeah, but just found out recently that he'd been mered to sleep with duct tape over his mouth and his hands tied and then we find out how he got free and five out of the compound or to a different part of the compound, and there were five jeeps and the algerian army had bombeded the jeeps and out of the five jeeps, the bomb had wiped out four of them. and they had obviously lost their lives, but lucky enough for my brothe
government spending and increase the size of the government. >> we are -- [ all talking at the same time ] >> you've seen -- a trillion and a half dollars in spending cuts and saw $600 billion in new revenue. they have been taking -- >> george, if you take a look at what really was done dealt with the easiest 3% or 4% of the problem. first mile of a marathon and want to celebrate at the half marathon mark when they got -- >> that's why what the republicans did was smart. first of all, they took the debt limit and default and shutting down the government off the plate. but they also said, we want because this is the one place where they are getting through to people. we want the senate to pass a budget and they are correct -- >> which they haven't in four years. >> the senate haven't done it because the democrats don't want to say where they would cut and that is a smart political move to make. >> instead of fighting the president fighting democrats in the senate. >> that's right, and the two big occasions coming up are march 1st which is when the sequester kicks in and there are a large
. >> reporter: a worst case scenario, an eroding tax base. the government demanding more from lower income people. and the future of this baby, a potential revolt. >> this boat won't float if that continues. >> reporter: miriam hernandez, abc news, eyewitness news. >> that's pretty fascinating. you wouldn't think that. i mean, a lot of countries have problems with not having enough babies, but you wouldn't think the state of california. >> in 2011, the u.s. had 63 births per 1,000 women. compare that to the baby boom generation, 122 births of women of child-bearing ages, 15 to 44. >> are you going to do your part? you've got two. >> i might. i've always wanted four. >> you better get going. >> my husband counts so i have three. >>> it's one of the most heroic jobs in the world, walking into fire to do battle and save lives. >> up next, we'll see what a firefighter sees on the job and hear what he goes through in the middle of an infer know. it's all from his perspective and it's all coming up on "world news now." ♪ goodness gracious, great balls of fire ♪ ♪ you came along and moved m
, after much prodding, because i'm afraid one day the government may come after me, and i will need to use my assault weapon on u.s. soldiers that are coming to my house. they don't say it exactly that way, but that's what it always boils down to. and that's -- republicans need to understand that at the end of the day, that's just a losing argument. >> well, it's a slippery slope argument. and the danger for that for the nra essentially by saying any gun control is unacceptable, then it puts itself outside the substantive argument, and that's actually a risky strategy. i actually thought yesterday was an interesting day in american politics. i thought it was a really big, bold, comprehensive proposal by the president which is good because it gives you a narrative. if the problems are that big, you actually need a big proposal to match it. it also gives you some room for compromise. there's a great line in robert caro's latest biography of johnson. they're talking about how big to be on civil rights and one of the so-called wise men goes to johnson and basically said that's not practical. i
of the united states government, trigger an increase in interest rates, and thwart our economic recovery. that is just irresponsible. it is hip critical, and it is what is wrong with washington and it will fundamentally hurt our economy to make some cheap partisan hypocritical political points. >> congressman, i want to ask you about sandy because there's a vote on the house floor tonight, as you well know, and it is a very strange procedure that came out of the rules committee where he are going to have the base vote first and then the amendments. tell me how you think this is going to work for the community you represent. >> look, i'm not interested in a procedure. i'm interested in the outcome. >> what will the outcome be? >> i'm interested in the solution. the solution i hope will be a bipartisan vote to get this done. i have constituents who are still suffering. businesses that are still hurting. homeowners and renters who still need help. it is one thing to be devastated by a weather storm. it's another thing to be devastated by a political storm. i have been working with congressm
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